Milan Kundra popularized this idea in his book The Unbearable Lightness of Being, which grapples with the insignificance of events that are “light” – that have no major lasting repercussions or significance. An average human has about 50,000-70,000 thoughts a day, most of them slipping through the cracks and being forgotten. Ideas, stories, pieces of rare insight can flare up, never be recorded and then be forgotten forever, disappearing into the recesses of recycled thought.

Over time, there have been so many people who have recognized this and agonizingly tried to piecemeal these thoughts together by different forms of documentation. Simultaneously, now more than ever has been in history, data is being recorded and stored. This leads to a lot of the ideas being immortalized in the digital world, leading us to feel as though we are communicating, adding to the vast storehouse of human knowledge somehow.

“Engaging in dialogue is more relevant today than it has ever been, even though we are penning down our thoughts, thinking that people are seeing them and really caring”

However, documenting this way makes us feel like our need for following-through on topics, discussing them with others, and chalking them out into physical fruition to immortalize them is unnecessary. Everything already looks immortalized on a screen, even if nobody is reading it, or interacting with it. As a result, there are lots of half-baked half-ideas out there, incomplete because they were never brought up in dialogue with another person because it was felt that they didn’t need to be brought up.

These ideas could have, however, blossomed into beautiful theories, pieces of art, business ideas or ideas for social change. That’s why engaging in dialogue is more relevant today than it has ever been, even though we are penning down our thoughts, thinking that people are seeing them and really caring.

There are beautiful things waiting to come into fruition if we got up and talked to people excitedly about our ideas in order to preserve them. A light in the eye, a passionate mannerism – they all go long ways in touching the hearts of others, in collaborating ideas and coming up with plans or theories. A dialogue could bring you closer to another person, not only the idea.

Dialogues are a way to solidify ideas in a collective inter-subjective tangibility. They polish ideas, they grow and change and become an amalgamation of ideas. Two minds are better than one! They’re better for you, they’re better for your idea, they’re better for the world.